Lifter Profiles

NASA

Hit Counter since 7.24.10

| Ken Kaiser- CO | Deborah James-TX | Chris Beck | Gary Clock-ND | Tyson Meyers-KS | JT Hall-KY | Heena Patel-CO | Mike Adelmann-NM |

| Rich Kahle-NM | Henry Thomason-TX | Richard Byars-CO | Chris Droegemeier-KS | Daryl Johnson-AR |

 

To Nominate A Lifter For An Interview Contact NASA

NASA will be doing a series of Lifter Profiles in the next few months so our members can get to know some of NASA's most prolific and supportive lifters and administrators.

 

Future Profiles may include the following lifters and administrators of NASA

*Jim McDermott-CO  *Rich Kahle-NM  *Bobby Wilson-NC  *Dan Black-OK

*Kent Burgess-WV  *Terry Hedrick-TX  *Mary Hetzel-CO  *Steve Korff-WI   *Andy Shields-VA  *Jimmy Adkins-WV

*Larry Donahue-OH  *George Wells-TX  *Robbin Hedrick-TX  *Laura Anderson-MO  *Bill Anderson-MO

If you have any suggestions for a lift being interviewed please send your suggestion to me by e-mail. All interviews will be the exact same questions so that we can compare them 

 

Ken Kaiser  - PRO Power Sports Lifter - A "Pro" In Every Sense Of The Word

by Job Hou-Seye


Ken Kaiser has been a supporter of NASA Power Sports for a number of years.  He did quite well in this year's PRO Power Sports Meet, on Sunday, October 17th, finishing 2nd Place in the Lightweight Curl Division, with a 165.35 Lbs. Strict Curl, which was 99.31% of his bodyweight.  As a 10 year Veteran of NASA, and a recent PRO Lifter, Ken seemed like a good choice for our National Inteview in the month of December.
Job: When  did you get started in lifting and what was your motivation to become a lifter?

 
Ken: I've lifted as training for other sports since 1975 (although coaches were not nearly as knowledgeable about strength training back in those days-My high school basketball coach wouldn't let us lift at all during the season and didn't want us doing any upper body work ever, as he said it would , "mess up our shooting touch".  In 2000 I was lifting in a Bench Press for Easter Seals fund raiser.  Jim McDermott came up to me and told me that the weight I'd just lifted would be a state record and invited me to the next NASA meet.  I took him up on the invite and at 40 years of age competed in my 1st sanctioned meet.
 
Job: How is your training different for each meet?
 
Ken: My training doesn't really differ from meet to meet.  I think that consistency in training is a big key to success. I do deadlifts, back and light curls on Mondays.  Heavy BP, triceps and abs on Tuesdays.  Squats and legs on Thursdays.  Light BP and shoulders on Friday.  Heavy curls and abs on Saturday.  My only real concession to age is that I used to build up to meets in 12-16 week cycles without any breaks, now I fit in deload weeks every 4 weeks or so depending on how I feel.
 
Job: Do you have anybody that you consider to be a lifting mentor or somebody who motivates you?
 
Ken: Jim McDermott is the guy who got me started in powerlifting and Power Sports.  He is Mr. Powerlifting in Colorado and is a mentor and coach to any lifter who wants to get better and is humble enough to listen.  Colorado is blessed to have many great lifters who are always there to motivate and encourage other lifters; lifters like: Casey Brown, Todd Campbell, Larry Dennis, Richard Byers, Roland Saffy, Dennis Peters, John Lynn, Tony Scott, Mary Hetzel, Krystie Hughes, Heena Patel, Richard Herrera, Matt Cussins, Jeff Miller, James Whitbread and the Hood family.
 
Job: Where do you like to train and why?
 
Ken: I train in my basement.  I like it for a few reasons. First nobody tells me that I can't use chalk or that my rack pulls are too noisy for the spandex, fern and chrome crowd.  Mostly I like it because I can train whenever I want.  With two daughters in middle school and our oldest and her husband just around the corner with our granddaughter (and one on the way) our life can be pretty busy so being able to train at home is really handy.
 
Job: Is there a retired lifter, or somebody who is still lifting, who you consider to be your idol?
 
Ken: Idol is a really strong word, I would say that only Jesus Christ is worthy of being idolized.  That being said there are definitely lifters that I admire and aspire to be like; Jim McDermott, Casey Brown, Terry Hedrick, Mike Ewoldsen, Mary Hetzel, Heena Patel and John Lynn.  I have a great respect for anyone who is willing to train hard and then get on the platform and compete.  There are lots of people running around saying, "I can bench 300 pounds" or, "In High School  I could squat that much" or "I could do that if I wanted to".  The people who deserve respect are those who do their best, those who don't just talk the talk but who prove it on the platform.
 
Job: How has being a strength athlete affected your personal life ?
 
Ken: I think that being a strength athlete affects everything that you do.  Setting goals, working your plan, being consistent, giving it your all in training and on the platform; I believe these things develop character and help you to be more successful in everything that you do in life including your profession and your relationships with others.  Being strong physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually takes dedication, commitment and persistence.  Anything worth having is worth working for.
 
Job: What are your personal goals over the next year or two?
 
Ken: Most importantly to be a better person, a better husband, a better father, a better grandpa and a better friend.  In lifting my goals for this year are to break my World Records in the Bench Press and curl, deadlift over 400 pounds and total over 1000 in unequipped.
 
Job: What is your favorite lifting event(curls, squat, benchpress, deadlift)?
 
Ken: If I had to pick one lift I'd say the curl.  I broke the American record in the curl three times in my very first meet and have set numerous American and World records in that lift over the past 10 years.  I was one of the first NASA lifters to curl over body weight.  And while there are probably some guys I don't know about, along with another Colorado lifter, Dan Wagman, I am the only Master 2 lifter I know who curls over body weight.  In my last meet I curled 171 pounds at a body weight of 163, which is not too bad for a skinny old grandpa.  Although I'm not good at it at all I also enjoy the Squat, for really different reasons.  In 1993 I totally destroyed my knee playing basketball.  After many hours of surgery, replacement cadaver ligaments and hardware installation I was told that there where things in my knee that just couldn't be repaired.  The surgeon and physical therapist both told me that I would always have trouble with my knee and I would never even be able to squat down to pick something up off of the floor.  In 1996 I tore the ACL in my "good knee" and never had it repaired.  So being able to squat, even though it's just over 300 pounds, feels like a big success.
 
Job: What are your personal bests in the gym and your personal bests in a meet?
 
Ken: Years ago I did a double body weight raw BP of 305 at a body weight of 150. Since I started competing at the age of 40 my best lifts in the gym are: Curl-180, Squat-325, BP-290, Deadlift-400.  My best lifts in a meet are Curl-176, Squat-320, BP-281, and Deadlift 391.
 
Job: Where has been your favorite place to travel to, and compete, in a meet?
 
Ken: To this point the only place I've lifted outside of Colorado has been Oklahoma.  So I'll say Oklahoma.

 
Job: What is your philosophy on training or where do you get your training tips?
 
Ken: Knowledge is power.  When I started out I bought Rich Peters' training tapes for the Squat, BP and Deadlift and they have been invaluable.  I typically read 2-3 book on powerlifting/strength training every year.  There is always great info on the NASA forums.  I also check out stuff on the internet, but you need to be really careful as anyone can pass themselves off as an expert and lots of the info is geared to lifters who are taking steroids and other illegal drugs.   I guess my philosophy is work hard and be consistent.  Everyone needs to take the basic scientific tenants (again see Rich's tapes) and fit them into what works for them personally.
 
Job: Currently, do you have "rival" lifter who you would like to defeat on the platform?
 
Ken: Not really. In fact one of the things I love about this sport is that your real competition is yourself.  Trying to get better and beating your own PRs, is for me anyway, what this sport is all about.
 
Job: What is your opinion of the recent PRO Meet?
 
Ken: It was an awesome event.  What a great opportunity it was for me to get to compete with some great lifters. I'd like to thank Rich and Tad Peters, JT Hall and all the sponsors who made this event possible.  What a joy it was for a very average lifter like me to be able to lift with true legends like Terry Hedrick and Casey Brown and the young studs like Charlie Harris, Nate Cahna and Vashon Perryman (and in true NASA fashion all of these guys are great human beings and true sportsmen).  I especially enjoyed the format this year of the light and heavy divisions.  I can't say enough about how top notch this event was (the fact that I won $650.00 didn't hurt my opinion of the event either).
 
Job: If there is a 2011 PRO Meet, do you plan to compete again?
 
Ken: I hope to but it is dependent on where it is held and what my schedule is like. Whether I compete or not I will purchase a Pro card to support the meet.
 
Job: The NASA Leadership has suggested that the PRO Meet could be improved, and the prize money increased, if every PRO Lifter from this year's PRO Meet would enlist 3 Lifters from back home to buy PRO Cards.  What do you think of this idea?
 
Ken: Great idea! Rich and the Executive Committee do so much for the lifters, it's time for the lifters to step up and give back to the organization.  If the lifters want NASA to continue to flourish, to be the best powerlifting organization in the world, then they need to support it.
 
Job: Please discuss any topic we haven't touched on or anything you want people to know about you that we haven't discussed?
 
Ken: I guess I'd like to end with a plug for NASA.  It is the greatest powerlifting organization in the world.  NASA is based on family values, honesty, loyalty and it is run to benefit the lifters not to put money in the pockets of the meet directors.  You absolutely have to love that fact that NASA lifters are drug free.  Young athletes can look to NASA for role models who prove that you don't need steroids or other drugs to be strong.
 
Finally Job, I want to thank you for the opportunity to be interviewed, it's quite an honor.  I enjoy the Wisconsin Powerlifting News and admire all that you do to promote the great sport of powerlifting.  Thank you.  To all the lifters: train hard, be strong, and God bless.

 

 

DEBORAH JAMES- TX

"The Queen of West Texas Powerlifting"

by Wendy Hou-seye

If you asked which lady lifter has participated in more Texas meets in the last 6 years, both as competitor, and staff member, the answer would almost have to be one of two Texas ladies.  Deborah James has been a major asset to NASA Powerlifting in both Texas and Oklahoma, and our featured National lifter for the month of July.
 

         Wendy: When did you get started in lifting and what was your motivation to become a lifter?

 

Deborah: I first started powerlifting as a senior in high school.  I had two very dear friends that competed for my high school and dared me to compete.  During that time, there were no girls in the Panhandle of Texas that competed in the Texas High School Powerlifting Assocation or the Texas Women’s High School Powerlifting Association.  Kyle King and Jesse Walton believed that it would be hilarious to have a girl compete with all of the boys and dared me to do it.  I waited until my senior year and I then started competing and everyone felt it was a joke, including my coach, until I made it to the Regional meet and then qualified for the State meet, being the first in my high school to ever qualify for state, boy or girl.  My high school did not even have the money to send a coach with me, so my dad, Mike Fowler coached me at the Regional and State meet.  I then went to college and laid out of powerlifting for six years.  I still judged local high school meets and loved the sport, but did not know there was an association for “grown-ups”.  I began to work at the local juvenile detention center and my supervisor, Neil Eddins, and I had judged high school powerlifting meets together.  He told me there would be a meet in Amarillo, Texas, and encouraged me to compete.  At this point I thought I had been out of the sport too long and laughed it off.  Neil then put a NASA West Texas Regional Meet entry form in my box at work.  I then dared my husband, Robin, to compete and he begrudgingly agreed to try out powerlifting.  We have competed in the West Texas Regional meets every year since 2005.  I guess you can say that my motivation to begin lifting both times was that I am always up for a dare and cannot stand it when someone tells me I can not or will not do something!  If it were not for Neil, I would still just be out there wishing I could compete again.

 

         Wendy: How is your training different for each meet?

 

Deborah: I would say that I generally have kept the same training for every meet, but I have learned different techniques and strategies throughout the years that I try out .  If they work, I incorporate them and if they do not, I keep doing the same thing I have always done.

 

      Wendy: Do you have anybody that you consider to be a lifting mentor or somebody that motivates you?

 

Deborah: I feel that I learn from everyone that I compete with.  I must say that Neil Eddins motivated me to rejoin the sport.  Robin motivates me every time that I do not want to go to the gym and every time I get discouraged in the gym.  He is my constant companion both in the weight room and outside of it.  I would not be able to continue to compete and push myself if it were not for his constant love and encouragement.

 

         Wendy: Where do you like to train and why?

 

Deborah: I train at Amarillo Town Club.  I do not necessarily love training there, but they have the majority of things I would need.  There are not that many options of where to train in Amarillo so I just  kind of make-do with the Amarillo Town Club.  I coach anywhere from 5-10 people at a time and we just meet up at the Amarillo Town Club and kind of make-do with what we have.

 

      Wendy: Is there a retired lifter, or somebody who is still lifting, who you consider to be your idol?

 

Deborah: I feel that I learn something from everyone I have ever shared a platform with, whether that be good or bad.  I learn everyday from the guys I coach.  I am greatly motivated by Elaine Waugh out of New Mexico because she keeps pushing her strength to new limits and having a great time on the platform, regardless of her age.  We also have a great time entertaining each other at National meets by giggling and encouraging each other.  I think of all the little aches and pains I have and see Elaine compete and they all just seem trivial.  Rich Kahle and Teale Adelmann have also been great motivators for me and are always willing to share their knowledge.   I must also say that I have not found many NASA lifters that were not super-encouraging and always willing to share their knowledge with me.   A more recent motivation is watching my mother, Sharla Fowler, battle breast cancer like a champ and kick breast cancer’s butt.  That, and she is usually yelling at me from the announcer’s stand!

 

      Wendy: How has being a strength athlete affected your personal life?

 

Deborah: Except for the obvious weird bruises and funny looks when I try to explain bench shirts or squat suits to non-powerlifters, it has greatly enriched my life.  I have met amazing people, blasted through barriers, and learned to never stop setting goals and attempting to push past them.  I am very blessed to have an understanding spouse that realizes hours in the gym are well worth it and can actually be substituted for a date night!

 

      Wendy: What are your personal goals over the next year or two?

 

Deborah: To be able to squat in a meet again.  The biggest goal is to be able to bench press more than my husband!  No, more seriously, I am reaching for a goal of 275 in the bench press and a 375 in the deadlift.

 

      Wendy: What is your favorite lifting event (curls, squat, benchpress, deadlift)?

 

Deborah: I must say I used to hate bench press, but I really love to bench now.  I must say that deadlift is my favorite of all lift because it is just a pure strength feat and the hard work is usually behind me, at least for this meet!

 

         Wendy: What are your personal bests in the gym and your personal bests in a meet?

 

Gym – Squat 365, Bench 255, Deadlift 320

Meet – Squat 350, Bench 236, Deadlift 330

 

       Wendy: Where has been your favorite place to travel to, and compete, in a meet?

 

Deborah: I loved competing in the NASA USA Nationals in Las Vegas, Nevada.  I loved being able to compete for NASA and against another NASA team and then be able to see all my friends from all over the nation and have the Las Vegas experience all at the same time.  I also loved seeing my little brother’s (C.M. Fowler) face when he got a big old hug from a Las Vegas showgirl!

 

       Wendy: What is your philosophy on training or where do you get your training tips?

 

Deborah: I follow a very basic powerlifting philosophy of triples getting ready for competition and everything else is a hodge-podge mix of styles and philosophies I have learned from fellow lifters and personal experimentation, including words of advice from Neil Eddins, Rich Peters, and Shelby Jones.  Getting closer to competition and being accustomed to my gear, I use more single repetitions.

 

       Wendy: Currently, do you have a “rival” lifter who you would like to defeat on the platform?

 

Deborah: I currently do not have any “rival” lifters, but I do always try to have good, honest, friendly competition with myself, Mary Hetzel, Sabrina Bagby, Krysti Hughes, Teale Adelmann, Meagan Pollock, and Heena Patel.  I also try to beat my husband’s bench press and do anything better than my little brother, C.M.

 

      Wendy: Are you excited about the upcoming World Cup meet?

 

Deborah: I am very excited about World Cup meet in Denver.  I love Denver and love to see everyone in NASA.  I hope to beat my P.R.’s in bench and deadlift, as I will be competing in Push Pull.

 

      Wendy: Please discuss any topic we haven’t touched on or anything you want people to know about you that we haven’t discussed?

 

Deborah: Go Steelers!  No, on a more serious note.  I consider that it is every serious powerlifter’s job to pass it on.  What I mean is that it is important to share your knowledge with a future generation and help spread the sport to all the younger kids out there.  I have a job to help troubled kids and I believe powerlifting is a sport that teaches the younger generation self-esteem, goal setting, and self-discipline.  I learned great patience from my dad and past coach, Mike Fowler, to always listen, insist, and keep pushing when dealing with younger lifters.

 

RICHARD BYARS

From Rugby to Mile High Champion
by Job Hou-Seye

Sometimes people catch your attention when you suddenly take notice of their humble nature.  They make a slow rise to the upper echelon of Lifters, until they suddenly make an impact on the Sport of Powerlifting.  Richard Byars caught my attention at this January's Natural Nationals, and with The World Cup in Denver only 5 1/2 weeks away, he seemed like an excellent choice for our National NASA Lifter to be interviewed for the month of June.

Job: When did you get started in lifting and what was your motivation to become a lifter?
Richard: I started lifting in college while playing rugby, later while managing a gym I gave bodybuilding a try. Powerlifting came about 5 1/2 years ago. David Riethmann told me "Pretty Boys" can't lift heavy weights so I decided to try, although right up to the meet I was whining to my wife that I had no idea how to bench let alone squat and deadlift. After that meet I was hooked. My motivation is that "no matter what numbers I put up today I know if I work just a little harder, to

Job: How is your training different for each meet?

Richard: Each meet has a different focus, Raw meets in fall and winter, Equipped meets in spring and summer. There are meets when I've focused on my squats, and only my bench went up, times when the deadlift was my focus and again only my bench went up. Then I began to see a pattern, but I'm not ready to accept that I'm not a 3 lift power lifter.
 

Job: Do you have anybody that you consider to be a lifting mentor or somebody who motivates you?

Richard: There have been many in the 5 years of lifting. Dave Riethmann and Rick Guerrero started me off and showed me how to lift and most importantly what parallel was. Jim McDermott included me in his team and I saw first hand how much comradery there is in Colo powerlifting. My current partners Howard Blackmon and Dale Bovat keep me going even when I become a head case, but my ultimate mentor is/was my grandfather, although he never saw me on the platform he was responsible for teaching me what it is to be disciplined and how to succeed in sport as well in life.
 

Job: Where do you train and why?

Richard: I seem to train all over the place. I have a gym at home, I lift at the Longmont Athletic Club because they have a great Kids Zone for my 5 year old son, I have gone to Jim McDermotts especially when I need advice on equipment and form and then on the weekends I train at Better Bodies in Westminster because that is the place I can Train with partners. Good partners are worth their weight in gold.
 

Job: Is there a retired lifter, or somebody who is still lifting, who you consider to be your idol?

Richard: This is easy. HOWARD BLACKMON, Howard is 64 and benches 450. I'm 48 with a 1 month old daughter, do the math, when the boys start coming around I need to be like Howard.
 

Job: How is being a strength athlete affected your personal life?

Richard: My wife trains and shows horses she also travels as a judge. I lift 4 times per week and compete 4-5 times per year.  We have to fill out a calendar for the year to decide who's doing what and when. I can't wait until my kids start competing.
 

Job: What are your personal goals over the next year or two?

Richard: This year I'd like to total 1600 push/pull 1100 and my long term goal is to do a triple body weight bench .
 

Job: What is your favorite event (curls, squat, bench press, deadlift)?

Richard: I've always liked the lying down exercises, like benching.
 

Job: What are your personal bests in the gym and your personal bests in a meet?

Richard: Unequipped squat 518 bench 392 deadlift 529. Equipped squat 529 bench 504 deadlift 535.
 

Job: Where has been your favorite place to travel to,and compete, in a meet?

Richard: Las Vegas was my first national meet and the one I'll always remember most. Being humbled by Norm Judd on the platform and out eaten at the buffet by Henna Patel. It was nice that my wife won over 4K on the trip also.
 

Job: What is your philosophy on training or where do you get your training tips?

Richard: LISTEN ,and keep your mind open. If you pay attention there is so much good advice out there, coming from great lifters. Some of it may sound crazy at 1st, like when Rich Kahle told me the key to benching is a shirt is to see how light of weight you can lift. It didn't make since to me at first but hey it's Rich Kahle,so I gave it a try. That advice is probably responsible for 40 lbs worth of gains on my bench this year. Thanks Rich
 

Job: Currently, do you have a "rival" lifter who you would like to defeat on the platform?

Richard: I've never had a real "rival" lifter to go against, but I kind of create ones in my head. For Natural Nationals while lifting unequipped it was Steve Korff,in Colo state meet it was Marty Einstein and for Bench Press Nationals is was Bill Shalkowski, although I've never met any of these men I keep their numbers in my log book and picture how hard they worked to get them, then I try to work harder. I am thinking of starting a rivalry with Henry Thomason though, come on Henry drop to 98's and well go at it.
 

Job: Are you excited about the upcoming PRO meet?

Richard: I love the PRO meets, think they are great for the sport and would do all of them if I could, but 15 years ago I was in an accident, broke my neck and tore the ligaments in both wrists and with no wrist wraps allowed in Power Sports I'll just have to wait for another PRO powerlifting meet.
 

Job: Please discuss any topic we haven't touched on or anything you want people to know about you that we haven't discussed?

Richard: I just want to say to those lifters who are new "get involved", load in or break down, give lifters who are alone a liftoff or help with their gear, or go to dinner after, ANYTHING. The people you meet in NASA are phenomenal and the more involved you are the greater the experience will be.
 
Thanks for including me in your Lifter Profile, it is really an honor.
 
morrow they can be higher."

 

 

 

Henry Thomason-TX

by Wendy Hou-seye

Henry Thomason currently holds the highest single-ply total of all time in NASA. In 2007, both Henry and Samson(10) lifted in 18 NASA meets, only to find out that NASA’s 2007 Overall Athlete of the Year, Earl Eavett, held the record at 19 NASA meets in a single year. Not to be outdone, Henry came back in 2008, and lifted in 20 NASA meets, to take the spot as NASA’s most prolific lifter of all time. For all of these reasons, and because he is my favorite "cougar-hunter," I chose Henry as our NASA lifter to be interviewed for the month of May( Gotcha Henry! ).

Rich Kahle-NM

NASA's 2009 Overall Athlete of the Year: RICH KAHLE
by Wendy Hou-Seye

Rich Kahle has long been one of the gentle giants in NASA.  Not only is he known as an outstanding athlete, but he has regularly brought both equipment and teen lifters to NASA's Highschool Nationals.  It seemed appropriate to interview him for the March repremiere of Wisconsin Powerlifting News.


Wendy: When did you get started in Powerlifting and what was your motivation to become a lifter?
 
RICH:  I began lifting as a kid by sneaking into my neighbor's garage to use his dad's weights because our parents thought it would stunt our growth but I didn't start to seriously train until I was in high school football.  Once football was over, I kept lifting and was into bodybuilding and working at a gym.  The owner offered to pay my entry fee for a meet that some of the lifters at the gym were going to and I was hooked.  No more dieting and I could lift heavy all the time.

I always loved to lift weights and the idea of being strong.

 
Wendy: How is your training different for each meet?
RICH:  At the start of my lifting career, I would just follow any program that I came across in PLUSA or one of the comic books (bodybuilding magazines) with the thought of just lifting more.  I had no strategy or real concept of training beyond train harder and train more.  Once I started to study the Soviet training plans, I really began to grasp the idea of long term planning for training.  Once I began Olympic lifting, I was exposed to the concept of multi-year training cycles.  The training programs I use now focus on certain physical or technical attributes.

In the past two years, I have been dealing with injuries and focusing on putting a whole three lift meet.  Good technique, good attempt selections, good execution.  This year, my first training cycle is for Western States and is a basic cycle to improve my work capacity after a layoff for injuries and is the setup for World Cup in August.  Since a big deadlift is the goal for World Cup, the goal for this cycle is to improve my lower back strength and restore my leg strength.  Upper body is also focused on my back and rotator cuff.  For Masters Nationals, it will be to get a big squat.  For Natural Nationals next year, a big bench press.  Each cycle allows for more work on one lift while maintaining the others.

I have also added throwing for Highland Games and Masters Shotput.  This has added a need for core strength that should benefit my powerlifting.
 
Wendy: Do you have anybody that you consider to be a lifting mentor or somebody who motivates you?
RICH:  My training mentors have always been in passing because southern New Mexico is almost devoid of powerlifting.  Since my return to powerlifting, Mike Adelmann has been instrumental to my development as a lifter.  His advice and assistance at meets has been key to me getting stronger, especially on bench press. It was his strongman meet that I was at when he says, "We're having a powerlifting meet here in two weeks..." and I came back to the Dark side.

Rich Peters has been very helpful at spotting little errors in my technique at competitions.  His advice has also helped me put my attempts together to have my best potential totals. 

Much of my training philosophy, came from Fred Hatfield , Dave Schroeder, and Supertraining from Mel Siff and Yuri Verkhoshansky.

As for motivation, my idols have always been the greats of the sport.  In squats, Fred Hatfield and Dave Pansanella.  On bench press, Tom Manno was a friend and someone to chase.  Anthony Clark was my early hero.  Deadlifting, Vince Anello and that picture in Arnold's Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding of Franco Columbu pulling always fired me up.
 

 
Wendy: Where do you like to train and why?
RICH:  I have my own gym that I have set up for strength sports.  I can make it suit my mood, whether that is with loud rock music or total silence.  I can train outside in the warm sunshine, except through our harsh southwest winters when it is only in the fifties in the afternoon.  I openend my own place because I got kicked out of every other gym in town for using chalk, banging weights, or occupying the squat rack for an hour at a time.
 
Wendy: Is there a retired lifter, or somebody who is still lifting, who you consider to be your idol?

RICH:  Paul Anderson was the strongest man to ever live.  He was not just a great lifter but a great human being.  Plus, his training programs are some of the best you can follow.
Wendy: How has being a strength athlete affected your personal life?
RICH:  Everything in my life has been about being a strength athlete since I was eighteen and did my first powerlifting meet.  I became a trainer originally because I got paid to teach and talk about what I love.  I met my wife at the gym.  My whole life has been devoted to me becoming the best strength athlete I can be.

Vince Lombardi would talk in "The Speech" about how football taught him all he knows.  All I know comes from the feel of knurling on my back or in my hands.  The lessons of life I learned from training and competing spread far beyond the technique for clean and jerk or squat.  Descartes said, "Cognito ergo sum" (I think therefore I am). I say, "Attollo ergo sum" (I lift therefore I am.)
 
Wendy: What are your personal goals over the next year or two?
RICH:  Over the next year, I am shifting my emphasis from the pure powerlifting focus I have had over the past 8 years back to what it was when I returned to powerlifting.  I want to be the best overall strength athlete.  My goal is to compete at the national championships for powerlifting, weightlifting, strongman, and highland games in 2111.  From a pure numbers stand point, I want to post a 2100 (800-600-700) powerlifting total, a 300kg (130 snatch, 170 clean and jerk) weightlifting total, and improve my throws in Highland Games by 20%.

I would also like to try my hand at Girevoy Sport.  This is a Russian sport involving kettlebells that is for maximum repetitions not weight.  So far, it has kicked my butt and I have failed to complete the event in training.

 
Wendy: What is your favorite lifting event(curls, squat, benchpress, deadlift)?
RICH:  My favorite lift is the squat.  I was a good squatter from the time I learned what parallel is and have enjoyed being good at a lift all the meatscicles and tank top titans at the gyms I trained at couldn't do.

I will admit that hitting a big bench press is a huge ego booster and is a rush.  Hitting a big deadlift is the most satisfying to me because it is the last lift of the day and means your training was right on and you are in shape.

 
Wendy What are your personal bests in the gym and your personal bests in a meet?
RICH:  My personal bests are 825 squat, 611 bench, 733 deadlift, and a 2116 total.  I have not lifted big in the gym since I first returned to powerlifting.  I can't reach that high emotional level in the gym that I get at a contest and rarely try a new PR.
 
Wendy: Where has been your favorite place to travel to, and compete, in a meet?
RICH:  Favorite place to travel to for a meet has been Las Vegas but the best venue for a competition is at Westwood High School in Mesa, Arizona.  Walt Sword and his kids always put a great meet on.
 
Wendy: What is your philosophy on training or where do you get your training tips?
RICH:  My training philosophy is a big conglomeration of the knowledge I have picked up over the years.  I was originally certified by the International Sports Sciences Association in 1994 and had the chance to get advice from Fred Hatfield.  I used some training programs designed by Dave Schroeder and always gravitated to the Soviet/Russian training programs but always had to modify them because I could not keep up.  I like to periodize my training to focus on different attributes over the year.  I have read everything I can get my hands on related to training.  I like to visit Rickey Dale Crain's table at the OKC meets to pick up any books I haven't read yet.

The best training books I have read are "The Science and Practice of Strength Training" by Vladimir Zatsiorsky, "Supertraining" by Mel Siff, "The Ten Commandments of Powerlifting " by Ernie Frantz and "The Complete Guide to Power Training" by Fred Hatfield.  I lean heavily on the translations Bud Charniga made of the old Soviet training manuals for training theory but reading them is like stereo instructions.  You have to read through a heap of stuff before you glean any usable concepts.

 
Wendy: Currently, do you have "rival" lifter who you would like to defeat on the platform?
RICH:  For a while, Henry Thomason and I would butt heads on the platform but I can not touch his numbers now. It is an honor to share the platform with him.  Before that, Justin Ransbottom was fun to have in my weight-class.  I would love to top Joe Thompson's 11.0 coefficient but I like food way to much...
 
Wendy: Are you excited about the upcoming PRO meet?
RICH:  Not for my own lifting but I am excited for the sport.  Professional strength sports is something I like to see and I believe is good for the whole sport. 
Wendy: Please discuss any topic we haven't touched on or anything you want people to know about you that we haven't discussed?

RICH:  There is a whole heap that could go here.  I believe that powerlifting, as well as all sports, teach so many life lessons that apply to the life off the platform and build character in those that participate.  In my youth, I didn't pay attention to that but over time, I learned to be a good person, a good friend, and a true citizen because of the time I spent sacrificing, training, and with the numerous people that make up the NASA family.  Thank you for being my friends and for all you have done for me.
 

 

Chris Beck-KS

Conducted: 11 Oct 2009 via email

CF: So what have you been up to lately if you don’t mind me asking?

CB: Well since the World Cup, I have been trying some new training.  I have also been training my 14 year old son, Jacob, for his first powerlifting meet.  It has been a blast watching him develop.

 

CF: How long have you been Powerlifting?

CB: I have been in powerlifting since 1983 where I got my first taste of this sport.  Since then it has been a large part of my life and has become a passion. 

 

CF: What has been your greatest achievement in Powerlifitng?

CB: Competing for 26 plus years in power lifting would be among the top.  I still want more out of the sport after all of these years.

 

CF: What’s a typical day at the gym like for you?

CB: A typical day at the gym is about 60 to 75 minutes.  In that time, we try to get the most out of that session and body groups.  Right now we are on a four day routine with max effort and speed days.

 

CF: How many meets do you compete in yearly?

CB: I try to compete in two to three meets a year if it works out with the family and financially.  There were some years I could only compete in one meet due to lack of finances.

 

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)?
CB: My ultimate goals are to break the top 10 in the 100 for bench only.  I would also like to break into the top 20s in powerlifting.  I want to bench 500lbs plus in the 181 and have a total of 1500.  Just for starters.  Just like everyone else, more is better.

 

CF: What is your favorite lift?

CB: My favorite lift would have to be the bench press.  The squats come close but the bench is number one for me.

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA right now? I know there are plenty who may come to mind, but only one.

CB: That is a tough one.  Right now, there are so many top lifters across the board.  I guess I would have to say Tyson Meyers.

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA from the past? It doesn’t have to be someone active.

CB: Mike Ewoldsen.  He still has one of the greatest passions for the sport, even though he hasn’t competed for a while, than anyone else that comes to mind.

 

CF: How do you explain the use of gear to a beginner?

CB: Well, being a geared lifter, I would say that it is a different level of lifting, if that is what you are looking for or want.  Don’t get me wrong, I think power sport and unequipped lifters are awesome.  I think the gear has allowed me to go 26 years safer.

 

CF: Do you train other people to powerlift?

CB: Right now, I am training my son and I trade training info with a good friend of mine and who ever ask.  The three of us have been able to motivate each other and have a great time doing it.

 

CF: Have you sustain any injuries in your career? How did you cope with getting healed and getting back on track?

CB: I have had a few injuries which include my left shoulder, right and left hip, lower back and upper back.  I have been told I am not the most patient when it comes to my injuries.  Due to these injuries and the time frame in which they happened is why I was a bench only lifter for so many years.  After some constant badgering from my friend, I finally returned to the three platforms and have been able to stay healthy so far.

 

CF: How has this sport transformed over the years?

CB: The sport has changed for the good and bad.  The equipment has made some unreal advancements that have been great for the support and safety of the lifters.  Don’t get me wrong, I think single-ply is great, the advancement in knee wraps and wrist wraps has helped some of us to continue to lift and compete in this great sport.  I am not a fan of multi-ply and feel this equipment hurts the sport of powerlifting.  I am glad to see NASA keep their standards by not allowing multi-ply equipment into competition.

 

CF: Do you consider powerlifting a Sport?

CB: YES, YES, and YES.  I have participated in other sports and I worked 110% in every one of them.  When it comes to powerlifting, I train as hard if not harder.  I know this has been said by others but it is as true for me as it is for them, “When I am not training, I am thinking of training.  When I am not competing, I am thinking about the next meet”.

 

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?

CB: WATCH and LISTEN!  I cannot stress this enough.  I have learned some of the best information about training or techniques from others at a meet or by just talking with some of the other lifters.

 

 

CF: How has powerlifting changed your life?

CB: Well, without powerlifting, I would not have met my wonderful wife.  I wouldn’t have some of my greatest memories and great friends that I do.  And my life wouldn’t be as full and complete without them.

 

CF: Anyone you would like to thank for helping you along the way in your Powerlifting career?

CB: Well, yes. First I would like to thank my parents for buying me that first weight set and for helping me attend those first meets.  I would like to thank Perry Evenson for introducing me to powerlifting.  My football coaches for teaching me that you have to work hard for what you want.  I would like to thank the different training partners over the years, Raymond, Don, Jason, Korey and the others.  I would like to thank Rich Peters for all of his advice and for this wonderful organization he has provided us.  I would like to thank Chris Droegemeier for his help and motivation over the last couple of years.  Lastly, I would like to thank wife, Sonia and my Son, Jacob for putting up with me and helping me.  My family has helped and supported me more than I could have ever asked.  Most importantly, I want to thank our Lord, Jesus Christ, for protecting me in every lift during training and in competition.

 

CF: What are your best performances in NASA?

CB: My best lifts to date at a body weight of 177 lbs at 40 years old:

            SQT – 501 lbs

            BNCH – 446 lbs

            DL – 424 lbs

CF: What records do you hold? Any NASA State, American or World Records?

CB: The records that I hold are in the 181 lb weight class.

            STATE RECORDS - SM Pure – Bench only

                                                SM2 – Bench only

                                                M1 – Bench only

                                                SM Pure – Powerlifting SQT, BP, DL, Total

                                                SM2 – Powerlifting SQT, BP, DL, Total

                                                M1 – Powerlifting SQT, BP, Total

 

            AMERICAN RECORDS – M1 – Bench only

   M1 – Powerlifting BP

 

WORLD RECORDS – M1 – Bench only

                                                  M1 – Powerlifting BP

 

CF: Where do you rank in the NASA Top 100?

CB: In the NASA Top 100, I am ranked #18 in Bench Press only and #41 in Powerlifting.  In the NASA Master’s Top 50, I am ranked #5 in Bench Press only and #19 in Power Lifting.  In the Powerlifting Watch for 181 single-ply drug tested 2009 after the NASA World Cup, I am ranked #15 Bench Press. 

 

I would like to say “thank you”, Cyrus, for giving me this opportunity to share with the NASA family.

 

 

Gary Clock-ND

Conducted: 18 Nov 2009

 

CF: So what have you been up to lately if you don’t mind me asking?

GC: I just finished the Master’s Nationals in Mesa, Az.  I am a retired teacher, so I travel a lot to see my kids and grandkids in Chicago and St Louis.

 

CF: How long have you been powerlifting?

GC: I started in 1968. I guess that makes 41 years.

 

CF: What has been your greatest achievement in Powerlifting?

GC: I think being on the NASA team that went to Laughlin in 2003 and defeated the AAU team. That was a blast! I want thank Rich Peters for the opportunity to be on several NASA teams.

 

 

 

CF: What’s a typical day at the gym like for you?

GC: I train M-T-TH-F at our local YMCA which is very lifter friendly. I usually workout from 5:30 – 7:00 pm.  We do squats on Monday, Bench Tues-Fr, Deadlift Thurs.

 

CF: How many meets do you compete in yearly?

GC: I do our two local meets and one or two national meets each year.

 

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)?
GC: I would like to lift in M4.  I would like to squat 600, bench 475 and deadlift 600 all in one meet. One can dream!

 

CF: What is your favorite lift?

GC: It’s probably the bench press because I have made the most gains in it. I started out with a 95 bench when I was 19 years old.  In four months, I did 110. I am a very fast gainer! LOL

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA right now? I know there are plenty who may come to mind, but only one.

GC: Rich Kahle…A great lifter and a better person.

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA from the past? It doesn’t have to be someone active.

GC: Dr D. Johnson

 

CF: How do you explain the use of gear to a beginner?

GC: I tell it’s like racing, you have stock cars and super modified, you can race a stock car in super mod but you are going to lose. I tell lifters to compete in the division they are comfortable with at the time.

 

CF: Do you train other people to powerlift?

GC: I have helped dozens of people over the last 40 years. Some became national class and some did it for fun, like me.

 

CF: Have you sustain any injuries in your career? How did you cope with getting healed and getting back on track?

GC: Yes, I dislocated my shoulder when I was 20 years old, Doctor said I would never lift again and I would not have full use of the arm.  Sometimes doctors are wrong! I have had pinched nerves and muscle spasms that my chiropractor and massage therapist take care of for me.

 

CF: How has this sport transformed over the years?

GC: When I started lifting, we had only one organization, AAU. It was taken over by the USPF. The meets were larger in the 70’s with at least 10-12 in each weight class.  In big regional and invitational meet we had 20-25 in each class.  Meets were marathons,  lasting from 8 in the morning to past midnight on many occasions. No divisions, only weight classes.  In the late 60’s, heavyweight was over 198. How many more classes do we have now over 198? The improvement in equipment, suits and wraps have changed lifting  a lot.  Also safety is much improved over the years. NASA has the best spotters and loaders I have ever seen over 40 years of lifting.  They have saved me more than once. Thanks, guys.

 

CF: Do you consider powerlifting a Sport?

GC: Yes, I certainly do. It’s a sport that only the strong of mind and body can survive in over a long period of time.

 

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?

GC: I would say to find a mentor that really knows what they doing. Sometimes the biggest lifter in the gym might not be the most knowledgeable.  Make sure you have perfect form and don’t try to lift too much, too soon. Muscles can grow much faster than tendons and ligaments. Make sure you are done growing before putting lots of stress on the skeleton.

 

CF: How has powerlifting changed your life?

GC: Lifting has had an impact on everything I have done in my life.  I have traveled because of lifting. I have made many, many friends over the years from lifting. I used my knowledge of lifting to help my coaching career; we were always stronger than other teams if not as talented. 

 

CF: Anyone you would like to thank for helping you along the way in your Powerlifting career?

GC: The two people that started me lifting were James Rolle and Ken Weaver back in 1967.  We were Olympic lifters. My best lifts were 225 snatch and 305 clean & Jerk at 165 lbs.

Brad Weber started me powerlifting. Brad & I have lifted together since 1970. Brad was a freak of nature back then, he squatted 600, bench 430 raw and deadlifted 630 weighing 177. I lifted in the 70’s with Jim Rush who was a great 165 lb lifter. In the 80’s Jeff Meyer became a regular training partner for many years.  In the late 90’s, my nephew Eric Clock got me back into full meets again. By 2002, Norm Judd, Brad Weber, Tracy Larson, Bill Johnson and I became Magic City Muscle and went to our first NASA meet in Nashville, Tn, Master’s Nationals.   Tracy Larson, Bill Johnson & Bob Brunner have become  my training partners in the last few years. I want to thank them all for helping me in my lifting career.  The most important person in my lifting career is my wife,  Doreen, who has put up with me for over 40 years. Thanks, D!

 

CF: Do you hold American/World Records?

 I hold several American and World records in 3 weight classes, 198, 220, and 242 in PL, PS, BO and P/P in M2 & M3. Rich Peters has the best record system in the sport. Mike A. and Clyde do a fantastic job with the top lifter list and American/World records. I just keep North Dakota records and that’s a big job.  I can’t imagine how big their jobs are.

 

 

CF: Where do you ever ranked in the NASA Top 100?

GC: Yes, have been ranked in the 100 in all divisions, both open and masters over the last few years.  That’s probably what I consider my best accomplishment was to be in all lists, PL,UPL,PS, BO, and PP in the same month.

 

 

 

 

Chris Droegemeier-KS

Conducted: 05 Oct 2009

 

CF: So what have you been up to lately if you don’t mind me asking?

CD: I’ve been really busy lately.  The day after lifting at the World Cup I started school for massage therapy. The only free time I have had the last two months were Friday evenings and Sundays. I just finished the first 150 hrs; I’ll have a two month break then finish out the rest of the 500 hrs graduating April 6, 2010.  During the two month break I’m trying to spend time with my wife and getting ready for Kansas Regionals. 

 

CF: How long have you been powerlifting?

CD: 6 years, my first meet was the Kansas Grand September 2003.  Back when it was the 205 weight class.

 

CF: What has been your greatest achievement in Powerlifitng?

CD: I’ve been on the NASA board of directors, Kansas State Chairman, won athlete of the year twice once for Sub-Masters and once for the Open class and Webmaster of the year.  All great achievements’ so far, but I plan on competing for a long time so I’m hoping my “greatest” achievement is yet to come.

 

CF: What’s a typical day at the gym like for you?

CD: I train four days a week two for the bench and two for squat/deadlift. One heavy day and one light day for each. I train no longer than one hour a session.

 

CF: How many meets do you compete in yearly?

CD: Usually 4. Natural Nationals, Kansas State, World Cup, and Kansas Regionals.

 

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)?
CD: My goals change all the time, right now I want to squat 700 and bench 500 before I turn 40.  When I reach those more goals will come along, it’s one of the things I love about this sport. It’s a constant process of setting and reaching goals.

 

CF: What is your favorite lift?

CD: The squat.  It’s the first lift of the meet and sets the tone. I’m one of those sick guys that love to train for the squat. That’s probably why I usually end up training alone.

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA right now? I know there are plenty who may come to mind, but only one.

CD: It takes more than a big lift or a big total for me to consider a lifter impressive and there is no way I could name just one. Ones that come to mind right off the top of my head Chuck Cookson, Tyson Myers, Cyrus Ford, Jason Smith, Neil Eddins, Heena Patel, Chris Beck, James Hinson, Rich Kahle all fantastic lifters and great people. The things they do on and off the platfrom and in the warm up room are the things I find impressive.

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA from the past? It doesn’t have to be someone active.

CD: In no particular order Mike Ewoldson, Daryl Johnson, Terry Perkins and the late Jim Ayers.

 

CF: How do you explain the use of gear to a beginner?

CD: I try not to unless they ask me directly. It’s one of those things that if you don’t use it you wouldn’t understand it. If they are dead set on using gear I’ll try to help them learn how to use it safely.

 

CF: Do you train other people to powerlift?

CD: Yes, I will help anyone in this sport if they ask. I have trained several lifters over the years and seen a lot of them come and go.

 

CF: Have you sustain any injuries in your career? How did you cope with getting healed and getting back on track?

CD: My second NASA meet ever I herniated two discs in my lower back when I let my squat form go.  I fought lower back pain from it for three years. I finally found the right combination of chiropractic, massage, and A.R.T that I’m now pain free.

 

CF: How has this sport transformed over the years?

CD: The biggest change I’ve seen is the complete trashing of the rules to get bigger numbers.  Not in NASA, but these other organizations that allow really high squats, non locked benches, and hitched non locked deadlifts and knee wraps under bench shirts, just so some guy can claim the highest squat, bench, or total of all time, it’s ruining the sport I love.

 

CF: Do you consider powerlifting a Sport?

CD: Absolutely!  We train just as hard if not harder than athletes in other sports do.

 

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?

CD: Find someone that knows the rules and proper technique and learn everything you can from them.  The first two years train and compete raw and build up a good solid base.

 

CF: How has powerlifting changed your life?

CD: It has made me more focused and goal oriented. Given me lifelong friends and above all else it keeps me sane!  No matter how bad a day I’m having I can take all of my frustrations out on the weights!

 

CF: Anyone you would like to thank for helping you along the way in your Powerlifting career?

CD: Rich and Tad for giving me a platfrom to lift on. Chris and Sonia Beck for inspiring me, pushing me and cheering for me. Troy Stuart and Mick Hauser for being some of the greatest training partners I’ve ever had. Brick Scheer for giving me a place to train.  The late Jim Ayers for so many things I can’t even begin to list. Last but not least my wife Sherri for making sure I’m always well fed and humble.

 

CF: What are your best performances in NASA?

CD: 622 squat, 462 bench, 501 deadlift, 1576 total in the 220 weight class.

 

CF: What records do you hold? Any NASA State, American or World Records?

CD: I hold several Kansas State records and an American record squat raw powerlifting and an American record equipped bench full meet.

 

CF: Where do you ever ranked in the NASA Top 100?

CD: I’m currently ranked #20 men’s equipped powerlifting

 

**************************************************************************************************

Daryl Johnson-AR

Conducted: 20 Sep 2009

 

CF: So what have you been up to lately if you don’t mind me asking?

DT: I have been retired from teaching for some time now (14 years).  My wife Tobey and I travel as much as we can, mostly by motorcycle.  In the last 29 years, we have ridden in all 49 continental States at least 3 times and all Canadian Provinces 2 or more times (including the Yukon and Northwest Territories).

 

CF: How long have you been powerlifting?

DT: I lifted my first 7 foot bar in 1966 at the age of 36.  That was 43 years ago.

 

CF: What has been your greatest achievement in Powerlifitng?

DT: Longevity, perhaps.  The lift that I am most proud of is my 601 pound squat at the NASA World Meet on June 9, 2002 in Nashville.  I was just a month short of being 72 years old.

 

CF: What’s a typical day at the gym like for you?

DT: My workouts were never intended to be “all consuming”.  My workout partner for the last 30 years is James Hodges (also a NASA State, American and World record holder) and he and I both made our greatest progress in a 4 day workout week.  We worked each powerlift twice a week.  One day going 3 sets of 3-5 maximums.  With second workout with that lift with 3 sets of 5-8 at 75% of maximum.  James usually did more bodybuilding work than I did.  We were usually in the gym 2-2 ½ hours at a time.

 

CF: How many meets do you compete in yearly?

DT: I usually only lifted in 2 or 3 meets annually.  I enjoyed the El Dorado meets with Bob Ross pre NASA and loved the NASA Natural Nationals and the Masters- Sub-Masters meets.

 

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)?
DT: My powerlifting goals have more than been met.  I have won my class in the State, National and World Meets.  I have met, competed with and against the best lifters in the world.  I have had the opportunity to travel to countries and places that would have been impossible if not for powerlifting.  Tobey and I have powerlifting friends locally and worldwide.  Having James as my same workout partner for the last 30 years must be some kind of record.

 

CF: What is your favorite lift?

DT: I enjoyed all 3 lifts.  My bench is probably my poorest competition lift, 352 was my best in a meet.  My best deadlift was 618 at 57 years old and my best squat was 611 at 60 years old.  Without a doubt the squat is the best strength building lift.  If you can’t squat, you can’t win.

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA right now? I know there are plenty who may come to mind, but only one.

DT: How can you choose just one?  I would be happy to say either Mike Ewoldson or Terry Perkins.

 

CF: Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA from the past? It doesn’t have to be someone active.

DT: Donnie Cole

 

CF: How do you explain the use of gear to a beginner?

DT: Supportive gear has done more to harm powerlifting than any other thing except drugs.  Protective gear is acceptable.  There is a fine line that is hard to define between the two.

 

CF: Do you train other people to powerlift?

DT: For 18 years, I taught a Bodybuilding and Powerlifting course at the Community College here in Blytheville, Arkansas for P.E. Credit.  I taught Biology, Botany and Zoology here and being able to teach and work with young men in Powerlifting was a very satisfying period in my career.

 

CF: Have you sustain any injuries in your career? How did you cope with getting healed, and getting back on track?

DT: My worst injury was a small spinal erector muscle tear during squat warm-ups at a National Meet.  I can still feel it occasionally.

 

CF: How has this sport transformed over the years?

DT: In the early years, the meet director only purchased 33 trophies for the entire contest. 3 places in 11 weight categories.  Now with all the sub-categories and age groups, hardly anyone goes home without a trophy.  Some will leave a meet with 5 or 6 trophies.  I can accept most of the age groups as they are now but I really think that the distinctions in the Sub-Masters group are a bit much.  I may not be scientific proof, but I think I am a good indicator that we don’t start losing power at 35 years of age.  

 

CF: Do you consider powerlifting a Sport?

DT: Powerlifting could be a bigger sport than Olympic Lifting if not for drugs, supportive gear and meet directors that make a mockery of the sport by selling trophies with little or no judging involved and no universal rules for gear or procedures.

 

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?

DT: Do every exercise as if it were to be judged in a meet and NEVER use enhancement drugs. Be careful of gym partners that tell you that your squats are deep enough.  At a meet, ask a judge to check your depth in the warm up room.

 

CF: How has powerlifting changed your life?

DT: This part of the interview could be a Doctoral Dissertation.  I have mentioned some of the outstanding outcomes of my lifting career; places, people and personal achievements.  I have been so fortunate in being able to get the education that I have and to enjoy good health along the way.  At one time I was the youngest college Dean of Students in the State of Kansas.  I have at one time (in my career) been a college Academic Dean, Director of Community Services and Chairman of the Science and Math Departments at Arkansas Northeastern College for 15 years.  Impressive???, maybe to some, but in my hometown, I am known as “ the guy that lifts weights”.  Has powerlifting changed my life?  I THINK YES!

 

CF: Anyone you would like to thank for helping you along the way in your Powerlifting career?

DT: In 1966, AAU controlled powerlifting.  Bill Clark of Columbia, Missouri was one of the developers of the sport.  Bill kept all sorts of odd lift records as well as promoting PL.  I taught with a young math teacher named John Breshears. John was a very bright athletic wannabe.  He read all information available from Clark’s Weightlifting Newsletter, Strength and Health and Perry and Mabel Raders’ Publications of Nebraska.  Breshears needed a training partner and persuaded me to take part.  He took me to my first meet in Kansas City in 1966. John convinced me that squats were the power builders.  Secondly, James Hodges or I would never have enjoyed the successes we have had without the benefit of each other.  Rich Peters and NASA gave us (and thousands more) the opportunity and venue to show our potential. And last, but certainly not least is my wife Tobey.  The support she gave me is truly amazing.  Tobey always said that powerlifting is the most boring spectator sport.  To combat this, she became an International judge in the USPF, IPF and NASA.  She has been selected NASA Female Referee of the year at least 6 times and is a member of the NASA Hall of Fame.  Thank God for my friends and my soulmate.

 

CF: What are your best performances in NASA?

DT: In a NASA National Masters Sub-Masters meet when I squatted 611, benched 352 and deadlifted 618.

 

CF: What records do you hold? Any NASA State, American or World Records?

DT: The last time I checked I still hold about a dozen NASA World records.  I am most proud of the 601 squat at age 71.  I know of no other lifter in the world that has accomplished this feat at this age.

 

CF: Where do you ever ranked in the NASA Top 100?

DT: Using age and weight coefficients, Powerlifting USA, ranked me at number 10 All-Time Master Powerlifter.  I was truly honored to be the first inductee into the NASA Hall of Fame and was selected as one of the 1990’s Athlete of the Decade

 

 

Mike Adelmann-NM

Conducted: 15 Aug 2009

CF: Mike Adelmann is one of the strongest powerlifters in NASA. He has been recently inactive while recovering from an injury.  I think he may be back soon once he rehabs his injury and slowly gets back to training. After lifting and competing for over 20 years, a nice break from the sport will do him well.  It is well known that a lifter may stop competing temporarily because of an injury, but lifting will always be in their heart. Mike will be back on the platform soon, and I hope his comeback is even better than when he left. Mike, Keep Lifting Large…

Speaking of Lifting Large, Mike and his wife Teale owns LiftingLarge.com, a website which sells powerlifting equipment and apparel. Their company gives back to NASA and it’s lifters by sponsoring several events.  LiftingLarge.com is also sponsoring several athletes in powerlifting this year. The company also supports the powerlifting community by not only selling equipment, but they can give expert advice from years of experience with powerlifting equipment and accessories. Thanks Mike for taking the time to answer my questions about products on LiftingLarge.com.

 

CF: How long have you been powerlifting? 

MA: 23+ years

 

CF:  What’s a typical day at the gym like for you?

MA: I train 4 days a week. Ideally I deadlift on Monday, bench on Wednesday, squat on Friday and do bench assistance on Saturday.

 

CF:  How many meets do you compete in yearly?

MA: I have competed in over 100 meets in my career.  I have not competed in over a year now but usually only 2 meets a year.

 

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)?

MA: My ultimate goal used to be to have the highest NASA total.  Goals change as we age and now I just hope to get back on the platform again soon. My long term goal is to keep competing until I get old and gray.

 

CF: What is your favorite lift?

MA: Hands down no question. “SQUAT”. Are there other lifts? LOL.

 

CF:  Who is the most impressive lifter in NASA right now? I know there are plenty who may come to mind, but only one.

MA: On the male side I would have to say Henry Thomason. It is amazing to me that he can keep hitting heavy weight week after week. On the female side I would have to say Heena Patel. To come back after surgery so quickly and start setting records and pr’s is amazing.

 

CF: How do you explain the use of gear to a beginner?

MA: That is usually a hard thing to explain. A beginner see’s it as cheating. Is it cheating? I say “yes and no”. I tell them as long as you follow the rules of the organization then it is not cheating. If they want to step onto the platform and lift to win in the open geared category then they need to use gear. I explain that gear helps you lift more it does not make you a stronger lifter for the most part. I try to keep newbies away from gear for as long as possible. A beginner in gear is a train wreck waiting to happen.

 

CF:  Do you train other people to powerlift?

MA: I have been training other lifters for probably 15 years. Training other lifters is almost as enjoyable as getting 3 white lights on a personal best squat. I am training 2 IPF world champions right now and 4 other National level lifters. I just renewed my personal trainer certification and want to start training more athletes that want to excel at any sport. I am currently working on setting up a couple of powerlifting seminars in our gym to teach the 3 lifts to new and intermediate lifters.

 

CF:  Have you sustain any injuries in your career? How did you cope with getting healed and getting back on track?

MA: I did not have any injuries that set me back until after the Las Vegas meet in 2006. I tore a tendon in my foot then and just had shoulder surgery in April of this year. The shoulder surgery has taken the wind out of my sails. I can sleep through the night now but still cannot squat. As I said before are there any other lifts but squat?  As you get older injuries just take longer to heal. I just have to remember to take my time or I will never be back on the platform. Stretching and flexibility are 2 things I have not focused on for the last 2 decades.

 

CF:  How has this sport transformed over the years?

MA: There are too many organizations and it is too splintered. To many people think they can do it better than everyone else so they try. The end result is a watered down sport. I kind of equate it to how many types of mustard are on the grocery shelf. There have got to be 20 variations of mustard. We all try a few different types but always end up back with the one we love and the one that works for us. Support the mustard you love and help it grow.

 

CF: Do you consider powerlifting a Sport?  

MA: Sure it is a sport. I think for 49% of the lifters it is more of a hobby. To get smarter and stronger you need to study, analyze and lift smart. 49% of the lifters just lift no reading, no studying, and no analyzing. They just lift. They also complain that they can never get any stronger but that is a whole different subject.

 

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?

MA: Latch on to an experienced lifter and soak up the knowledge. Notice I said an experienced lifter and not a strong lifter. There is a big difference in someone who lifts big and someone who can coach and give a lifter direction. Listen to that lifter and check your ego at the gym door. We all had to start at square one. Most of all you CAN start competing BEFORE you are ready to break records. So many people tell me they want to powerlift but don’t want to make a fool of themselves and won’t be ready to compete until they can break records. If that is your goal then stay on the treadmill talking on your cell phone.

 

CF: How has powerlifting changed your life?

MA: My life is completely powerlifting oriented. It has made me goal oriented and driven. It has introduced me to some fantastic people and created some great friendships. It introduced me to my wife who is the most important person in the world to me. I really can’t even remember not having Powerlifting in my life and can’t imagine it not being in my life.

 

CF: Anyone you would like to thank for helping you along the way?

MA: There is this guy that I thought was a big jerk back in the early 90’s. I can’t remember his name off hand. I think he still runs that cult like organization. He brought powerlifting to me and for that I am forever grateful. Thanks to you Rich. I have had so many great training partners over the years and conversed with some many great lifters. If I started naming people I am afraid I would leave someone out.

 

CF: What are your best performances in NASA?

MA: Squat 827lbs, Bench 573lbs, Deadlift 716lbs, 2077 total at 308’s

 

CF: What records do you hold?  

MA: None

 

CF: Where do you rank in the NASA Top 100?

MA: Since I maintain the Top 100 lists I can put myself in any position at anytime. LOL. I haven’t competed in over a year so I am not on the lists.

 

MA: Thank you Cyrus for taking the time to conduct this interview.

 

************************************************************************

Heena Patel-CO

Conducted: via email on July 30, 2009

Profile:

Weight class: 132 (currently)
Height: 5'2
Coach: Jim McDermott
Team: If I am on a team it's the McDermott team
Favorite sport: Don't have a favorite!  But if I had to choose one its POWERLIFTING-- imagine that!!!! ;)
Favorite professional teams: Lakers and Steelers. I had to grow up watching them.
Favorite food: Salted peanuts with the shells on.
Favorite movie: Don't have one
Favorite TV show: Don't have one; I really don't watch much TV.
Favorite powerlifter: I follow the following powerlifters on Powerlifting Watch and the organizations they compete in: Jennifer Thompson, Priscilla Ribic, and Teale Adelmann.  I really would like to achieve some bigger numbers! :)

CF: Heena is one of the top female powerlifters in the USA. She packs a lot of power in such a petite body. One of the nicest people you will ever meet. She supports NASA meets here in Colorado and out of state. She has not been powerlifting that long but she has come a long way despite a major set-back with having back surgery in 2007. Along the way she has broken and currently holds several State, American, and World records. She is a NASA referee who supports the organization, and most importantly, she is a great competitor.

Heena’s current NASA rankings:
#1 in the Women’s Top 50 Unequipped Powerlifters
#1 in the Women’s Top 20 Push/Pull
#1 in the Women’s Top 50 Powerlifters
#1 in the Women’s Power Sports Top 50
#1 Women’s Bench Press Top 20

CF: How long have you been powerlifting?
HP: Almost five years, August 2009 will make it five.

CF: What turned you on to powerlifting? 
HP: Someone I dated, their parents forced me into my first Powerlifting meet in Aug 2004. I begged and pleaded with a "NO-NO-NO" and they kept forcing me, until I signed up.  Now I am HOOKED, they created a MONSTER!

CF: What is your best NASA competition lifts to date?
HP: In the 114's - Squat: 281 Bench: 242 Deadlift: 363
         123's - Squat: 314 Bench: 237 Deadlift: 360
Right now I am in the 132's - Squat: 330 Bench: 281 Deadlift: 408

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)? 
HP: My goals are totaling over 900 raw and over 1100 in gear.

CF: What is your favorite lift?
HP: The Deadlift! I am built perfectly for this lift, and it is my strongest.
   
CF: How much longer do you think you’ll be in this Sport?
HP: I hope at least a few more decades.  I may go away for a little while, but I will definitely come back.  I love this sport!

CF: What could make this sport better?
HP: Making it an Olympic sport; I would love to see that.

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?
HP: Be patient, be positive, have a great attitude, train smart and train hard, and most importantly nutrition, nutrition, nutrition! I had major back surgery (my back is fused) in Dec 2007, and did my first meet back Oct 08. You can achieve anything if you set you mind to it, and want it that badly.

CF: Who do you thank for your success?
HP: I owe most of it to Jim McDermott, my training coach. He works so hard and pushes me so far and makes me believe I can set some amazing numbers, and I do.  He is the greatest, THANKS for your support JIM!  Thanks to my training partners Krysti and Dennis, and all the folks at Jim’s place where I train on Tuesdays and Saturdays.

CF: What records do you hold that you are proud of the most?
HP: Too many to write all of them, but a few good ones are:
114 American/World Records Bench: 242
132 American/World Records Bench: 281 Push/Pull: 688
132 A/W Equipped total: 1005lbs
Women's Un-Equipped Bench Press Top 20

 

 

********************************

J.T. Hall - KY 

Conducted: 28 July 2009

 

Profile: JT Hall lifts primarily in NASA as a bench press only lifter, but he has also competed in curl competitions as well. JT promotes and supports NASA meets by publishing upcoming events to various forums on the Internet, and has wrote articles for Powerlifting USA. JT attributes his longevity in the sport to training smart and staying injury free. JT holds several records to include, state, world, American, and Pro. He is available on the NASA Training Forum to offer advice and tips to the novice and experienced lifter. He’s had much exposure in the sport and has been recognized by sponsors and appeared in magazines. Here is a list of accomplishments JT has achieved as a powerlifter:

 

NASA Administrative positions  

-  A member of the NASA Executive Committee for 4 years

-  A member of the NASA Board of Director for 1 year

-  A member of the NASA Pro Selection Committee for 1 year

-  NASA Kentucky Records Chairman for 9 years.

 

NASA Powerlifting Accomplishments  

2009 NASA Pro Powersports Bench press winner ($1000 cash award total)

2009 June cover issue of PLUSA

2008 NASA Hall of Fame Inductee

2008 NASA SubMaster Bench Presser of the Year Award

2008 May cover issue of PLUSA

2008 July cover issue of JOPP

2008 NASA Hall of Fame Inductee

2008 NASA Pro Powersports Bench press winner ($1,275 cash award total)

2008 June NASA Co-Lifter of the Month

2007 April NASA Co-Lifter of the Month

2007 NASA SubMaster Bench presser of the Year Award

2005 NASA Runner-up Bench presser of the Year Award

2004 NASA Bench Presser of the Year Award

2003 NASA Bench Presser of the Year Award

2002 NASA Powersports Bench Presser of the Year Award

 

NASA Powerlifting Records (current)

 

220 lb weight class

American Record: 485.01 lbs (Pure, Open)

 

Powersports American Bench Press Record: 485.01 lbs

 

World Powersports Bench Press Record: 485.01 lbs

 

Pro Powersports Records by Weight Lifted: 473 lbs/Subtotal 660 lbs

 

Overall Pro Powersports Bench Press World Record:

-Actual Weight Lifted: 473 lbs

-Coefficient Overall: 2.5691

 

242 lb weight class

American Record: 490.52 lbs (Pure, Open)

 

Kentucky Unequipped Pure and Open BP Record: 490.52 lbs

 

Kentucky Equipped Open BP Record

181 lb class: 385 lbs

198 lb class: 456.5 lbs

220 lb class: 522.5 lbs

242 lb class: 555.5 lbs

 

 

 

CF: How long have you been powerlifting?

 

JT: I have been competing since 1994 and still have my award from that competition.

 

CF:  What turned you on to powerlifting?

 

JT: I wanted to show the powerlifting community that you could be a top competitor while truly being drug free.  Also, to let lifters know that strength comes from the Lord, not steroids. I truly believe that lifters need to know that you can win pro meets, set American records and be on the cover of Powerlifting USA magazine while being drug free.  There is a saying, “One man can make a difference” and I truly believe that I am that person. I want lifters that are thinking about doing steroids to think about me and hope that they will follow my example.

 

CF:  What is your best competition lifts to date?

 

JT: My best competition bench press is 562 in a single-ply Inzer rage x.

 

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)?

 

JT: My ultimate goal is to be ranked #1 in the World. There can be only one (lol).

 

CF: What is your favorite lift?

 

JT: My favorite lift is the bench press.

 

CF: How much longer do you think you’ll be in this Sport?

 

JT: I will compete until the rapture occurs.

 

CF: What could make this sport better?

 

JT: Less hating and more support from your fellow man.  Certain websites fuel hating for business purposes and being biased towards other federations. I have my own personal groupie hating fan club. Hopefully, this will end someday. I would like to see more companies sponsor drug free powerlifters instead of non-drug free powerlifters.  The grass root and drug free lifters are the future lifters.  They are usually in it for the long haul. The vast majority of lifters are drug free and compete in drug free organizations. The biggest and most prestigious meets are the drug free meets in my opinion. It just makes more sense for companies to back drug free lifters and drug free meets.

 

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?

 

JT: Learn the rules of the federation you are going to compete in, train with good form and give your body plenty of rest.  You must put the time in your training to get the results you want on the competition platform. If you are looking for sponsors, you must do something that stands out and sets you apart from the rest of the competition.

 

CF: How has powerlifting changed your life?

 

JT: Powerlifting has given me a great platform to promote drug free powerlifting and to give back to the lifters.  I enjoy being the NASA KY State Chairman and a member of the NASA board.

 

CF: Who do you thank for your success?

 

JT: 1 John 4:4   Ye are of God, little children, and have overcome them: because greater is he that is in you, than he that is in the world. My success is totally due to Jesus Christ dying on the cross for my sins.  He has given me supernatural strength due to him living inside me.  Thank my beautiful wife and daughter for supporting me. Thank you Rich Peters for creating a great federation for lifters to enjoy.  Thank you Greg Van Hoose for giving me a great opportunity to promote drug free Powerliting in the Great Bluegrass State. My great sponsors for their support: INZER, BMF SPORTS, USP LABS, ADRENALINE GEAR and QUEST NUTRITION.  Having great sponsors helps make my training, nutritional supplement intake and traveling expenses a lot easier. I love getting checks in the mail from BMF SPORTS, and I have not paid for powerlifting equipment in 9 years.  I am a blessed man!

 

CF: What are your best performances in NASA?

 

JT: My best performance was at the 2008 and 2009 NASA Pro Power Sports Championship because I won more than $2,000.

 

CF: What records do you hold?

 

JT: I hold several pro, American and state records.  I will list my top 3 most prestigious records:

1. NASA Pro Power Sports 220 bench press and subtotal record

2. NASA World Power Sports 220 bench press record

3. NASA American Unequipped 220 & 242 bench press record

 

CF: Are you ranked in the Top 100?

 

JT: I am currently ranked #2 in the Unequipped BP (490.52 lbs) and I was previously ranked #5 in the Equipped BP (556 lbs).

Cyrus & Cindy Ford
"Live life to its fullest"  
 
cford7@msn.com
 

**************

 

Tyson Meyers - KS

Conducted 21 July 2009

Profile: Tyson is a dedicated top powerlifter in the sport who lifts primarily in NASA. Not only is he one of the top lifters in NASA, but he is one of the top lifters in the USA. Currently, Tyson is the number one unequipped powerlifter in NASA with an impressive total of 1,852 lbs. Tyson lifts in the 242 lb weight class and owns several American and State records. He also won NASA’s first Pro Powerlifting meet taking home $3,400.  

CF: How long have you been powerlifting?

TM: I have been lifting for 13 years.

 

CF:  What turned you on to powerlifting?

TM: I was pretty strong while in high school, and I had a coach who was a mentor and he introduced me to powerlifting. I also had back surgery at 15 years old and I used lifting as a way to strengthen my lower back.  

 

CF:  What is your best competition lifts to date?

TM: Best lifts to date are: unequipped SQ 727, BP 452, DL 677; Total 1,852 lbs

 

CF: What is your ultimate goal(s)?

TM: My ultimate goal is to total 2,000 lbs raw. The key to this sport is to be injury free, and without injuries it will lead to longevity which will allow me to reach my goal. A short term goal is to total 1,900 lbs within the next year.

 

CF: What is your favorite lift?

TM: My favorite lift is the squat.       

 

CF: How much longer do you think you’ll be in this Sport?

TM: I plan to be around and active in the sport for another ten years. I will determine at that time which direction to take. I love working-out to get stronger, so it will definitely be hard to walk away from powerlifting. It will be a hard decision, but I’ll see what happens ten years from now.  

 

CF: What could make this sport better?

TM: To make this sport better I would like to see fewer organizations, less equipment, and less lifters using performance enhancing drugs.

 

CF: If you could offer any tip to an up-and-coming lifter, what would it be?

TM: I would recommend developing a strong base first, and stay away from equipment in the beginning.

 

CF: How has powerlifting changed your life?

TM: Powerlifting has made me mature, it’s made me humble, it’s given me a direction in life, it’s motivated me, I’ve become dedicated to working-out and staying in shape, and last but not least, it has allowed me to achieve my goals.